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Mornings With Mark
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Australia, Huawei, Apple, and the Government of Canada

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Full machine generated transcript follows

Good morning, everybody. How you doing today? I realize this is a bit of a mid mornings with Mark been processing a lot of stuff this morning. So I'm a few things happen that I want actually share some pages with you on my screen. So as we walk through this because I think for very disparate things are actually related.

I'm in the related or really interesting way. So the first is Australia a passed a bill recently today or yesterday, depending on how long your timezone sitting around encryption and this is a much pan Bill. I'm I don't want to dive into the politics behind it. But what it does seem to enable is the Australian government to force it companies to create back doors into an able lost access to Berry's Communications.

Now, I'm a huge supporter of lawful access, but I'm also a huge opponent of forcing companies to change their technology to enable that lawful access. Cuz I primarily means trying to break encryption scheme cell groups is hard enough to do correctly. I'm in a protects the vast majority of what we do in the internet.

So forcing companies to build weaker encryption and back doors into encryption is a major problem because it's going to create week or security and I hasn't a disproportionate impact vs. What you're trying to accomplish with the law. There's a reason when you have on your phone that the device itself and Crips and answer the most stuff and everything on this device is supposed to be just mine if law enforcement request the device and go through them various mechanisms in place to gain access to the device.

That's one thing and they can also subpoena Apple to get access to iCloud. There's a lawful access provision their iMessages still end-to-end encrypted. So unless I backup to iCloud they need my device to get access and that's a different level of requirement is a different role required level of legal proof and he can't do it.

It's scale. Play it's going to be a balancing act this Australian laws way out of whack and it puts Australian users and internet users in general just happened here in Canada. Huawei. CFO was transiting through Canada and was arrested to extradite to the us know this is apparently related to sanctions, but it's the latest step in an escalating effort against getting high or getting wob an effort to get Huawei equipment out of Western and five eyes networks because they they're alleging that the equipment compromised now interested if it's a telecom transmission equipment, even if the equipment was compromised if you're using end-to-end encryption and the equipment isn't one of those ends things that Transit across this equipment would still be relatively safe depending on you know, assuming that nobody had the ability to crack at the level of encryption use Goodnight, and and because the Telecom equipment the Midway point so my device in your device there wouldn't be actually crap.

So it's interesting in that. I've always being accused of doing the thing that Australia just legally mandated at the same time this morning at Apple released a brand new paper. I let me zoom in on it here on differential privacy and I'm just starting to read through this with apple and Stanford.

They have this aspect of doing differential privacy, which is a new wave anonymizing data of doing analysis on data while maintaining privacy on it, and that's a really really interesting stuff. So I'm going to dig into there and then the kind of endless on a happy note. Add to see you know, just need to be all doom and gloom good friend of mine.

Stephen Christiansen tweeted me this this morning. I with a quote from a new governor of Canada initiative around a government ID systems that source code are they want to default to open source, and they want to make that Source available publicly. So this section in here, you can tell the government document as theirs for some point five sub-points OC to 383 says that by default in a source code written by the government must be released in an open Forum at by a government of Canada websites and services designated by the treasury Board of Secretariat, which is a department within the Canadian government has a definitive push for the Canadian government to go open in the same directive and they actually have the ability to our more they have the directive to push up data in open format to get this contrast of Australians trying to mandate tech companies in here to give them off.

Axis at which I think is an over pivot of the protection. You know, what is it common for instant responders is common for intelligence services for military to only see the bad and not balanced with a good night. That's a mistake if needs to be readjusted somewhere with the pushing.

It's always being escalated with the accusation of the exact same thing in Australia just gave themselves the ability to do Apple still making pushes on differential privacy, which I think is phenomenal because that gives us the ability to do big data analytics will maintain privacy and the Canadian government has opened a whole bunch of things up around their it procurement.

It's an interesting interesting morning and I don't have a central theme there other than data is a critical resource in today's world it something that all different communities are looking at from different aspects the biggest challenge. I think we have is that we're all still connected the internet is inter after all so we have this challenge of laws made in one places or initiatives taken in one Community impact on the other so Hopefully it will all balance out, but lots to think about Lots, but I'm keeping my eye on just one of those thicker days.

I hope you are set up to have a wonderful day and talk to me online at Mark NCAA for those who in the block to the comment down below is always at 4 podcast listeners. Everybody else meet at Mark n. CA, what are your thoughts on any of these four issues all of them bigger theme at you know, did you hear of them? This is the first time let's just keep the discussion going cuz I think this is really fascinating stuff, and it has a real significant impact on how we live our digital lives.

Have a fantastic day and will talk to you soon. Good morning, everybody. How you doing today? I realize this is a bit of a mid mornings with Mark been processing a lot of stuff this morning. So I'm a few things happen that I want actually share some pages with you on my screen.

So as we walk through this because I think for very disparate things are actually related. I'm in the related or really interesting way. So the first is Australia a passed a bill recently today or yesterday, depending on how long your timezone sitting around encryption and this is a much pan Bill.

I'm I don't want to dive into the politics behind it. But what it does seem to enable is the Australian government to force it companies to create back doors into an able lost access to Berry's Communications. Now, I'm a huge supporter of lawful access, but I'm also a huge opponent of forcing companies to change their technology to enable that lawful access.

Cuz I primarily means trying to break encryption scheme cell groups is hard enough to do correctly. I'm in a protects the vast majority of what we do in the internet. So forcing companies to build weaker encryption and back doors into encryption is a major problem because it's going to create week or security and I hasn't a disproportionate impact vs.

What you're trying to accomplish with the law. There's a reason when you have on your phone that the device itself and Crips and answer the most stuff and everything on this device is supposed to be just mine if law enforcement request the device and go through them various mechanisms in place to gain access to the device.

That's one thing and they can also subpoena Apple to get access to iCloud. There's a lawful access provision their iMessages still end-to-end encrypted. So unless I backup to iCloud they need my device to get access and that's a different level of requirement is a different role required level of legal proof and he can't do it.

It's scale. Play it's going to be a balancing act this Australian laws way out of whack and it puts Australian users and internet users in general just happened here in Canada. Huawei. CFO was transiting through Canada and was arrested to extradite to the us know this is apparently related to sanctions, but it's the latest step in an escalating effort against getting high or getting wob an effort to get Huawei equipment out of Western and five eyes networks because they they're alleging that the equipment compromised now interested if it's a telecom transmission equipment, even if the equipment was compromised if you're using end-to-end encryption and the equipment isn't one of those ends things that Transit across this equipment would still be relatively safe depending on you know, assuming that nobody had the ability to crack at the level of encryption use Goodnight, and and because the Telecom equipment the Midway point so my device in your device there wouldn't be actually crap.

So it's interesting in that. I've always being accused of doing the thing that Australia just legally mandated at the same time this morning at Apple released a brand new paper. I let me zoom in on it here on differential privacy and I'm just starting to read through this with apple and Stanford.

They have this aspect of doing differential privacy, which is a new wave anonymizing data of doing analysis on data while maintaining privacy on it, and that's a really really interesting stuff. So I'm going to dig into there and then the kind of endless on a happy note. Add to see you know, just need to be all doom and gloom good friend of mine.

Stephen Christiansen tweeted me this this morning. I with a quote from a new governor of Canada initiative around a government ID systems that source code are they want to default to open source, and they want to make that Source available publicly. So this section in here, you can tell the government document as theirs for some point five sub-points OC to 383 says that by default in a source code written by the government must be released in an open Forum at by a government of Canada websites and services designated by the treasury Board of Secretariat, which is a department within the Canadian government has a definitive push for the Canadian government to go open in the same directive and they actually have the ability to our more they have the directive to push up data in open format to get this contrast of Australians trying to mandate tech companies in here to give them off.

Axis at which I think is an over pivot of the protection. You know, what is it common for instant responders is common for intelligence services for military to only see the bad and not balanced with a good night. That's a mistake if needs to be readjusted somewhere with the pushing.

It's always being escalated with the accusation of the exact same thing in Australia just gave themselves the ability to do Apple still making pushes on differential privacy, which I think is phenomenal because that gives us the ability to do big data analytics will maintain privacy and the Canadian government has opened a whole bunch of things up around their it procurement.

It's an interesting interesting morning and I don't have a central theme there other than data is a critical resource in today's world it something that all different communities are looking at from different aspects the biggest challenge. I think we have is that we're all still connected the internet is inter after all so we have this challenge of laws made in one places or initiatives taken in one Community impact on the other so Hopefully it will all balance out, but lots to think about Lots, but I'm keeping my eye on just one of those thicker days.

I hope you are set up to have a wonderful day and talk to me online at Mark NCAA for those who in the block to the comment down below is always at 4 podcast listeners. Everybody else meet at Mark n. CA, what are your thoughts on any of these four issues all of them bigger theme at you know, did you hear of them? This is the first time let's just keep the discussion going cuz I think this is really fascinating stuff, and it has a real significant impact on how we live our digital lives.

Have a fantastic day and will talk to you soon.